Building fair, democratic and inclusive societies in Africa.

The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation shapes national approaches to transitional justice and reconciliation in Africa.

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MEDIA RELEASE: IJR CALLS ON SA TO REACTIVATE THE STALLED PEACE PROCESS IN SOUTH SUDAN

IJR CALLS ON SA SPECIAL ENVOY TO SOUTH SUDAN, DEPUTY PRESIDENT CYRIL RAMAPHOSA, TO EXPLAIN THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SUDAN PEOPLE’S LIBERATION MOVEMENT IN OPPOSITION (SPLM-IO) LEADER RIEK MACHAR’S LONG-TERM STAY AND STATUS IN SOUTH AFRICA.  AND TO OPENLY COMMUNICATE SOUTH AFRICA’S PLAN TO REACTIVATE THE STALLED PEACE PROCESS IN SOUTH SUDAN The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation [...]

July 19th, 2017|

Attitudes towards interracial marriages in South Africa

Intergroup marriages are considered an important measure of the dissolution of social and cultural barriers, therefore of social and cultural integration. Despite coming from different backgrounds, partners in intergroup (here interracial) marriages are likely to share some common values and aspirations. These elements are seen to be enabling of social cohesion in multicultural societies. Elnari Potgieter, Project Leader for the South Africa Reconciliation Barometer at IJR, further notes that attitudes towards interracial marriages are of importance when considering intergroup marriages as a measure of integration.

July 3rd, 2017|

IJR Launches a Safeguarding Policy

The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation (IJR) has added a Safeguarding Policy document to its policies and procedures manuals to ensure that vulnerable groups and individuals engaging with the IJR and its work will continue to be protected and special attention is given to the potential risks posed and the potential needs of vulnerable groups. Watch IJR's Executive Director, [...]

July 3rd, 2017|

Internalised Racism – thoughts on the intersections of oppression

It has been over 100 years since Du Bois first described the effects of white domination and supremacy on the black mind. He reflected on how it affects a “double consciousness” as a peculiar sensation. The sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others, of measuring one’s soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity (Du Bois 1989). Ashanti Kunene, intern for the Sustained Dialogue Programme shares her thoughts on the intersections of oppression.

June 29th, 2017|

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South Africa Round 6 Survey: Analysis and Results

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