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2019 SOUTH AFRICAN RECONCILIATION BAROMETER LAUNCH

By |2019-12-03T11:53:39+02:00Dec 3rd, 2019|Categories: Uncategorised|

The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation cordially invites you to the launch of its 2019 South African Reconciliation Barometer (SARB) Survey Report on the 12th of December 2019. Conducted since 2003, the SARB Survey is the longest-running public opinion survey of its kind, which exclusively tracks processes of reconciliation and nation-building in South Africa. The survey [...]

Mental healthcare must back peace efforts

By |2019-09-16T11:58:56+02:00Sep 16th, 2019|Categories: Uncategorised|

Early this morning my phone beeps. The message is from my friend Rose in Juba, South Sudan. She is a devoted women’s rights activist.With the few resources at her disposal, she works day in, day out to contribute to building a better South Sudan for her children. Rose’s message reads: “My friend, now that you are [...]

The need for memorialisation in South Africa

By |2018-12-10T10:21:42+02:00Dec 10th, 2018|Categories: Uncategorised|

Around South Africa there are many statues of struggle heroes and museums that contribute to commemorating a part of our divided history. Some would say that we do not need such depictions of our past, others say it is part of remembrance and collective memory is important to truth and justice. Memorialisation, put another way, is [...]

Violent tactics undermine public trust in police

By |2018-12-10T10:13:51+02:00Dec 10th, 2018|Categories: Uncategorised|

The National Planning Commission (NPC) noted this particular issue with regards to policing in South Africa in their 2011 report: "The decision to demilitarize the police force, moving away from its history of brutality, was a goal of transformation after 1994. The remilitarization of the police in recent years has not garnered greater community respect for police officers, [...]

Staying true to a national vision

By |2018-11-01T13:57:54+02:00Oct 19th, 2018|Categories: Uncategorised|

Almost a quarter century into South Africa's political transition, most of its citizens continue to wait for its economic equivalent to transpire. Still poverty frames the daily struggles of far too many, while inequality sustains inherited asymmetric power relations that impede access to those resources that are essential to move ahead in life. In short, injustice still reproduces itself

African TRC experience: The unfinished compromise

By |2018-10-05T09:29:33+02:00Oct 2nd, 2018|Categories: Uncategorised|

2018 marks the 20th anniversary of the conclusion of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission (SATRC). The South African example seemed the perfect means for post-conflict societies to hold peoples and crimes accountable as a moral reckoning in building a new nation.

A different time, a different place

By |2018-09-17T09:22:46+02:00Sep 11th, 2018|Categories: Uncategorised|

The transition into a democratic dispensation had bodies such as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) tasked to delve into the violence and human rights violations of the apartheid era.  It was a process that was not without flaws as it separated the systematic injustices and oppressions from human rights violations

Gender-based violence: a continuum through womxn’s lives

By |2018-09-17T09:17:51+02:00Sep 10th, 2018|Categories: Uncategorised|

South Africa's history is marred by brutality where violence was used as a legitimate means to acquire power, assert interests and address conflict. The normalisation of violence constructed a society in which violence became a mode of communication. It became a norm

On Magnus Malan, the TRC and white victimhood

By |2018-08-21T11:55:23+02:00Aug 15th, 2018|Categories: Uncategorised|Tags: , , , , |

The Malan case is a powerful, meta-type example of how white violence can become victimhood and therefore worthy of protection and defence. The narrative around victimhood is that whiteness and, white people particularly, are the primary victims. We go to extremes to find redeeming factors to protect them.